Fishing New York Rivers
New York Fishing
Lake Ontario
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Oneida Lake
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Cayuga Lake
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Canandaigua Lake
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Seneca Lake
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Lake Champlain
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Lake George
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Otisco Lake
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Skaneateles Lake
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Keuka Lake
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Owasco Lake
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Conesus Lake
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Honeoye Lake
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Canadice Lake
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Hemlock Lake
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Sodus Bay
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Little Sodus Bay
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Port Bay
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Chautauqua Lake
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Great Sacandaga Lake
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Whitney Point Reservoir
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Otsego Lake
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Lamoka Lake
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Saratoga Lake
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Tully Lake
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Silver Lake
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Lake Placid
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Black Lake
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Waneta Lake
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Cross Lake
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North Sandy Pond
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Cuba Lake
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NY Rivers & Creeks
Salmon River
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St. Lawrence River
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Niagara River
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Susquehanna River
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Hudson River
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Genesee River
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Delaware River
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Chemung River
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Mohawk River
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Seneca River
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Cohocton River
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Oneida River
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Oswego River
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Canisteo River
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Catharine Creek
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Ninemile Creek
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Naples Creek
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Fall Creek

 

 

 

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Fishing New York

Fishing New York
Fishing in the State of New York offers anglers the opportunity at catching a wide variety of species. Whether you are looking to catch trophy Lake Trout in Lake Ontario, Walleye in Oneida Lake, Rainbow Trout in the Finger Lakes, or Bass in MANY Lakes, Fishing in New York provides something for everyone. FishingNewYork.org is your source for detailed information on the best New York Fishing Lakes, Rivers, and Creeks plus you can find New York Resorts, Fishing Charters, Fishing Guides, Campgrounds and much more for your next New York Fishing Trip.

New York Fishing

New York Walleye Fishing

 

Good sized Walleyes can be found in many lakes in New York State. In the spring, it is almost certain that walleyes will be in one of two locations: In the rivers that have a strong current or in a lake, over a shallow gravel bar that receives a good wave action. Because walleyes can be rather inactive due to the cold water, your lure or bait presentation should be dead slow, and put right in front of them. Rocky shoals and along gravel shorelines are popular spots for spring walleye in New York Lakes. As the waters warm into summer, walleyes will head for deeper waters. Some favorite walleye haunts include: above rocky points or extensions from shore with adjacent deep water, on large sprawling flats with a hard, clean bottom of sand or gravel, and with a dropoff to deeper water. Walleye are bottom feeders so they must be fished as close to the bottom as possible.

Top New York Walleye Fishing Waters

Oneida Lake

St. Lawrence River

Lake Champlain

Susquehanna River

Lake Ontario

Niagara River

Chautauqua Lake

Delaware River

 

New York Largemouth Bass Fishing

 

Largemouth Bass fishing season begins in mid-June in New York Lakes and Rivers and they are a popular catch throughout the state. As the water warms look for largemouth bass in the shallow bays that border the deep water. During the day the largemouths will be seeking the shady areas, such as in the weed beds. Concentrate your fishing on the corners of the beds and around any stumps, rocks or fallen trees that may be within the beds. Beds of lily pads that have clear water openings and passage through them are often excellent fish-holding locations. In late summer and fall, largemouth bass will often move out of the shallow bays and into the weed beds nearer deep water or along the weedy points of a dropoff. Also, don't overlook fishing under docks, boathouses, and floating rafts. In a river area look for largemouths in the back-water eddies, under overhangs, under banks, and behind current obstructions. The outside bends of a river can be a hotspot.

 

Top New York Largemouth Bass Waters

 

Oneida Lake

Cayuga Lake

St Lawrence River

Chautauqua Lake

Niagara River

Lake George

Hudson River

Saratoga Lake

 

New York Lake Trout Fishing

 

Lake Trout can be caught in waters throughout New York State and fishing begins April 1st. Lake Trout have an elongated body, large head, deeply forked tail and numerous pale or light colored spots. Coloration of the lake trout varies greatly from lake to lake; they may be greyish, greenish, brownish and sometimes blackish. The average lake trout weighs 4-10 lbs, with some over 30 lbs caught every year in New York waters. Depth, temperature and the amount of oxygen are the primary factors which determine the suitability of a lake for lake trout. They normally inhabit only lakes with a depth greater than 50 feet. In the spring, just after the ice goes out, lake trout are found near the surface and can be taken on light tackle. As the water warms up, they go deep and must then be sought with deep water tackle such as downriggers. In general, lake trout spawn on rocky reefs or shoals between September and November.

 

Top New York Lake Trout Waters

 

Lake Ontario

Lake Champlain

Cayuga Lake

Seneca Lake

Keuka Lake

Canandaigua Lake

Lake George

 

 

New York Northern Pike Fishing

 

Northern Pike can be caught throughout the year in a number of New York Lakes and Rivers. In the spring, they will congregate in the shallow bays near some type of structure or hard bottom and often around early weed growth. From about mid-June on, the northern pike will move to deeper water and will stay near structure such as the edge of a weedline, the deep water side of a shoal, or along dropoffs and rock ledges. Try fishing weeds that grow in patches rather than the thick weeds, especially open pockets in weeds. Also, look for good sized northerns in areas that harbor small fish, such as perch, sunfish, and rock bass. The best time for northern pike in New York Lakes and Rivers is early morning and dusk. In cold water, a slow troll or retrieve is best. In warm water, the reverse is true. The warmer the water, the faster your retrieve or trolling speed should be.

 

Top New York Pike Fishing Waters

 

St. Lawrence River

Seneca Lake

Lake Champlain

Niagara River

Lake Ontario

Lake George

Saratoga Lake

Black Lake

 

New York Smallmouth Bass Fishing

 

Smallmouth Bass fishing season begins in mid-June and they can be caught in many New York Lakes and Rivers. Smallmouths prefer a bottom of hard clean sand, gravel, clay or rock. They like to hang near rocky shorelines, sunken islands with a weed cover, and rocky shoals containing boulders, especially if these features are adjacent to deep water. Smallmouth bass will typically move into the rocky shallows in the late evening and early morning, migrating back to the deeper areas throughout the day. On bright days look for smallmouth bass near structures that provide shade. These areas could be steep dropoffs, boulders, high rocky points, concrete abutments, along dams, and in weed beds that spring from a hard clean bottom. In New York Rivers the smallmouth bass will be found in a current, providing there are lots of rocks and boulders present. The fast water eddies below dams and power stations are ideal smallmouth hangouts. Try the deep holes and rapids.

 

Top New York Smallmouth Bass Waters

 

Oneida Lake

Niagara River

St Lawrence River

Seneca Lake

Hudson River

Keuka Lake

Delaware River

Lake Champlain

 

New York Rainbow Trout Fishing

 

Rainbow Trout are a popular catch in New York Lakes, Rivers and Creeks and the fishing season begins on April 1st. The rainbows are a popular fish because of its fighting ability, dash and beauty. Coloration of the rainbows body varies with the environment. The fish may be bluish, bluish green, greenish or olive green on the back, silvery on the sides, and light below. A pink lateral band of variable width runs from behind the eye to the end of the body. The average size of rainbow trout caught is between 4-6 lbs, with many over 10 lbs caught every season. At spawning times, rainbows migrate upstream seeking swift waters and clean gravel. There are many rivers and creeks throughout New York state that produce incredible runs of spawning rainbows every spring and fall. Because the hooked rainbow trout supplies so many acrobatics, you can usually count on losing more of them than you catch.

 

Top New York Rainbow Trout Waters

 

Cayuga Lake

Seneca Lake

Catharine Creek

Naples Creek

Lake Ontario

Delaware River

Canandaigua Lake

 

 

 

New York Trout Fishing

To answer the question on where to fish for Trout in New York lakes, you must solve two problems. You first need to select the right area to fish in and then you need to determine the best depth to fish at. The selection of area can most often be done through a visual analysis, but the selection of depth requires applying a process of elimination. In other words, there are certain identifiable spots on the lake where fish are most likely to hang out, and some of these can be determined by inspecting the water or land characteristics. There are several factors that will determine the most likely fish hangout. First you must understand that Trout do indeed "hang out". Fish will choose specific waters that will provide them with crucial environmental requirements, as dictated by their habits, needs, and basic survival instincts. Trout have highly evolved instincts that are designed to deal with the five key survival requirements, namely: Temperature, Oxygen, Food, Shelter, and Reproduction. Fish will have a natural tendency to find secure, comfortable areas in any body of water and these areas are the ones that you will most likely find them in. Each type of Trout has a preferred ideal temperature range within which its metabolism will function effectively. Fish will most likely feed and be found in these waters.

 

The first two primary requirements for Trout in New York lakes are to find the right temperature and to find sufficient oxygen. These are the ideal temperatures for Trout:

 

Rainbow Trout - 57 F.

Lake Trout - 45 F.

Brown Trout - 60 F.

Brook Trout - 60 F.

 

Each fish will instinctively seek his own special comfort zone. Although they may travel through hostile waters and different temperature ranges, they will inevitably settle for their own preferred area. As water becomes too cold, their metabolism slows, and they become listless and will not feed.

 

Once Trout are able to satisfy their top priority items of temperature and oxygen, they will need to take care of the next two requirements - shelter and food. They will select sheltered areas to protect themselves from predators and bright sunlight. They will tend to situate themselves within short distances of structures or physical situations that will offer cover. Typically these are underwater drop-offs, shorelines, ledges, overhanging trees, channels, rocks, docks, underwater vegetation, and logs.

 


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